The Big Iodine Deficiency – Are You At Risk?

TheBigIodine

Were you aware that iodine deficiency is currently considered to be the most prevalent and easily preventable case of impaired cognitive development in children in the world?(1) Did you also know that Iodine deficiency disorder (IDD) is a serious public health threat for 2 billion people worldwide.(1)

Iodine is an essential trace mineral and is a critical component of the thyroid hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). Hormones like T3 and T4 regulate the metabolic cells and play an important role in early growth and development of organs like the brain. A deficiency and lack of intake of iodine leads to insufficient hormone production, which can adversely affect the kidney, heart, liver and the brain.(2)

Here's some iodine deficiency info that may shock you:

  • The World Health Organization stated, iodine deficiency affects 72% of the world's population.
  • David Brownstein found more than 96% of the 5,000 patients he tested were iodine deficient, in a clinical study he conducted.
  • The National Library of Medicine states, Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) are one of the biggest worldwide public health problems of today.(3)

Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) represents the different disorders that are associated with an iodine deficiency in a population. These disorders could be all preventable if the right dose of iodine is administered. Here's a few common disorders resulting from iodine deficiency: hypothyroidism, increased cholesterol levels, goiter, low fertility, breast disease, breast cancer, and increased infant mortality.(4)

Symptoms of Iodine Deficiency

  • Fatigue or lethargy
  • Brain fog
  • Memory problems
  • Thinning hair
  • Constipation
  • Depression
  • Difficulty losing weight
  • Headaches
  • Dry skin
  • Muscle weakness and joint stiffness

Risks Linked to Iodine Deficiency

  • Chlorinated and fluoridated water
  • Toxic chemicals in the air and food
  • Selenium deficiency
  • Pregnancy
  • Smoking
  • Poor Diet or Low Dietary Iodine Intake

1. Chlorinated and fluoridated water

Our water supply is loaded with chemicals like chlorine and fluoride. These two chemicals are halogens. These halogens are toxic to your body. Another halogen is Iodine. Iodine is the only halogen that the human body needs to live. One of the bad things about chlorine and fluoride is that they block iodine receptors and prevent your body from absorbing the crucial iodine it needs.

2. Toxic chemicals in the air and food

Bromine is another toxic halogen. Methyl Bromide is commercially used  as an ingredient in pesticides which are sprayed onto crops. Those same crops are then sold at your local grocery store and served on your dinner table. The worst part is that the risk is increasing as pesticide usage levels has been steady increasing.(5)

3. Selenium deficiency

Studies have shown, many who are diagnosed with iodine deficiency have shown selenium deficiency as well. The thyroid glands needs both iodine and selenium to produce enough thyroid hormones , but when you lack both or just one, your body has lowered thyroid hormone levels. Low selenium levels cause the thyroid gland to work harder to produce hormones. It's important to have both selenium and iodine to support thyroid health.

4. Pregnancy

The Journal of Pediatrics stated, about one-third of pregnant women in the U.S. are iodine-deficient. That's a shocking number but it actually gets worse. At the time, only about 15% of breastfeeding and pregnant women take iodine supplements. Iodine deficiency is associated with impaired brain function in infants, and stunted physical and mental growth.

5. Smoking

Smoke like tobacco contains a compound named thiocyanate. Thiocyanate inhibits the uptake of iodine and may be responsible for the reduction of levels. Tobacco smoke has a negative effect on thyroid function and can also block hormone action.(6)

6. Low dietary iodine intake

In 2004 a University of Texas study found that between 1950 and 1999 calcium, protein, iron, vitamin C and other vitamins and minerals in crops have been becoming increasingly depleted. They concluded that soil depletion had increased by as much as 40%.

Nutrients like iron, calcium or vitamins are naturally in the some foods. Iodine does not naturally occur in specific foods, instead iodine has to be present in the soil. The plant absorbs the iodine from the soil. Once that plant is harvested the iodine can then be ingested by eating foods grown from that soil. Unfortunately trace minerals like iodine are rarely added to our soils today.

Iodine is generally obtained through a healthy diet however it can be obtained from iodine supplementation. Sea vegetables and seafood are foods are great sources of iodine. The problem is with today's polluted oceans they may also contain toxins that inhibit your iodine absorption.

Nuts, seeds, beans, garlic and onions are good sources of iodine provided the soil contains sufficient amounts of iodine.

What Can You Do To Avoid An Iodine Deficiency?

Here's the daily recommended amounts.

Here's the RDA for iodine:

  • 1–8 years old — 90 micrograms every day
  • 9–13 years old — 120 micrograms every day
  • 14+ years old — 150 micrograms every day
  • Pregnant or breastfeeding mothers 290 micrograms every day

Nuts, seeds, beans, garlic and onions are good sources of iodine provided the soil contains sufficient amounts of iodine.

5 Foods High in Iodine

  • Seaweed 11% to 1,989% DV (1 sheet of nori)
  • Baked Cod 66% DV (3 oz)
  • Cranberries 60% DV (1 oz)
  • Baked potato with peel 40% DV (1 medium sized)
  • Raw Milk 37% DV (1 cup)

The 8 Health Benefits of Iodine

  • Optimizes energy levels
  • Boost immunity
  • Regulates the metabolic rate
  • Removes toxic chemicals
  • Helps to prevent certain types of cancers
  • Prevents impaired development and growth in children
  • Supports healthy skin and nails
  • Prevents enlarged thyroid gland

In Conclusion

  • Iodine is an essential trace mineral and is a critical component of the thyroid hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). Hormones like T3 and T4 regulate the metabolic cells and play an important role in early growth and development of organs like the brain.
  • A deficiency and lack of intake of iodine leads to insufficient hormone production, which can adversely affect the kidney, heart, liver and the brain.
  • Iodine deficiency includes many symptoms like fatigue, brain fog, memory problems, thinning hair, constipation, depression, difficulty losing weight, headaches, dry skin, muscle weakness and joint stiffness.
  • Risks for iodine deficiency include chlorinated and fluoridated water, toxic chemicals in the air and food, selenium deficiency, pregnancy, smoking, and low dietary iodine intake.
  • 150 micrograms a day for adults and children over 14 years old is the RDA for iodine. Pregnant or breastfeeding mothers are recommended to consume 290 micrograms every day.
  • 8 healthy benefits of iodine include optimizing energy levels, boosts immunity, regulates the metabolic rate, removes toxic chemicals, helps to prevent certain types of cancers, prevents impaired development and growth in children, supports healthy skin and nails, prevents enlarged thyroid gland.

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1.) Sustaining the elimination of iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/nmh/iodine/en/

2.) Micronutrient deficiencies World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/idd/en/

3.) NCBI  Health Consequences of Iodine Deficiency https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3074887/

4.) Wiley Online Library The Effects of Iodine Deficiency in Pregnancy and Infancy https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1365-3016.2012.01275.x

5.) Report Documents Pesticide Use Increases on GE Crops https://www.ucsusa.org/food_and_agriculture/our-failing-food-system/genetic-engineering/report-documents-pesticide.html#.W_86hGhKiUk

 6.) Changes in USDA Food Composition Data for 43 Garden Crops, 1950 to 1999 http://saveoursoils.com/userfiles/downloads/1351255687-Changes%20in%20USDA%20food%20composition%20data%20for%2043%20garden%20crops,%201950-1999.pdf